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Yesterday

#Regram#RG@extinctionrebellion: Over 1500 citizens gathered in at India Gate, in New Dehli, to demand immediate action on the cities hazardous pollution levels.⁣ ⁣ According to the World Health Organisation, air pollution in India is estimated to kill about 1.5 million people every year; these statistics make air pollution the fifth-largest killer in India. ⁣ ⁣People of all ages joined the demonstration, which succeeded to directly trigger action for Indian citizens:⁣ 1. The Indian Prime Ministers office set up a special panel to address the issue, within a few hours of the protest. The panel is due to report on the issue within 2 weeks.⁣ 2. The Supreme Court of India asked the Central Government and respective state governments to fix the crop and waste burning issue of Dehli within a week. ⁣ 3. The Center accepted that Green Fund will be used to combat toxic air pollution. ⁣ 4. The Indian Prime Minister asked the Agriculture Ministry to distribute equipment urgently so that crop burning is no longer necessary. ⁣ ⁣ Despite these promises, the air is still unsafe and activists will keep the pressure on until the air pollution reaches safe levels. ⁣ ⁣ The protest was organised by a collaboration of movements; @xrebellionind@LetMeBreathe_In@FridaysForFutureIndia_ along with other activists. ⁣ ⁣ Photography by Arjun Mahatta and co, via @FridaysForFuture ⁣ ⁣ #RightToBreathe#ExtinctionRebellion#IndiaGate#SolutionNotPollution#ActNow#RebelForLife

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2 days ago

#Regram#RG@undp: The port of #Mombasa in #Kenya is the largest seaport in Africa. It's also a key exit point for the trafficking of African wildlife. ⁠ ⁠ Last November, we joined @UNODC, The @worldbank, & #TheGEF in the launch of a 36-months-long initiative that targets shipping ports to reduce maritime trafficking of wildlife between Africa and Asia. ⁠ ⁠ According to the Elephant Trade Information System, the vast majority of ivory is trafficked by sea routes--as much as 72%. But only 1/3 of trafficked wildlife parts are caught and seized when they leave ports in Africa. Even if traffickers are caught red handed, only 19.3% of all seizures globally have led to convictions. ⁠ Funding for more law enforcement and investigators to hold traffickers accountable is vital to fight wildlife crime.⁠ ⁠ Thanks to a US$2 million grant from #TheGEF, partners have been increasing the number of trained wildlife law enforcement at ports across Africa and Asia. They've also used the funding to invest in a stronger communication and intelligence-sharing network between law enforcement and shipping and logistics sector workers from port-to-port across different countries. ⁠ ⁠ One of the most infamous and tragic cases of wildlife trafficking caught at Mombasa port involved two containers declared as tea leaves. Hidden underneath were three tonnes of ivory, four rhino horns, and teeth from leopards and cheetahs. Alongside elephant, rhino, and big cat parts, other wildlife and wildlife products commonly smuggled through Kenya’s seaports include pangolins, timber and shark fins.⁠ ⁠ 90% of Kenya's tourism depends on wildlife tourism. Protecting wildlife is critical to the country's economy and employment sector.⁠ ⁠ 📸: tobkatrina/Shutterstock.com⁠ ⁠ #Environment#SaveAnimals#EndWildlifeCrime#Wildlife

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3 days ago

#Regram#RG@greenpeaceusa: Fires have been ravaging Indonesia’s forests for months, causing severe respiratory infections to hundreds of thousands of people and putting millions of children at risk. The fires are used to clear forest and peatlands that are then turned into palm oil plantations. @nestle, @proctergamble, @unilever, and @mondelez_international are buying palm oil from producers linked to thousands of fire hotspots in Indonesia this year. Help protect and restore Indonesia's forests by demanding that these companies stop putting profits over our future. Petition in @greenpeaceusa bio.

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4 days ago

#Regram#RG@yaleenvironment360: Scientists have created fake rhino horn that looks and feels so much like the real thing they argue it could help undermine the illegal market for horn, lucratively sold as an aphrodisiac in traditional Chinese medicine. The artificial horn is made out of bundled horsehair glued together with a matrix of silk, giving the material the same collagenous properties as authentic rhino horn. But some conservation groups and scientists are challenging the concept, arguing that the artificial horn could simply drive up the value and demand for the real thing, as well as complicate law enforcement efforts to reduce poaching and illegal trade. To learn more, visit the @yaleenvironment360 website. Link in their bio. Photo credit: James Sanders/Flickr

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5 days ago

Lost…and found! The Silver-backed #Chevrotain, a miniature fanged ‘deer’ from Vietnam, has been lost to science for over 25 years, but thanks to @global_wildlife_conservation, the Southern Institute of Ecology and @leibnizizw, we now have camera trap photos of the Chevrotain from Vietnam’s coastal forests. This is the critical first step in preventing the extinction of the species, which is about the size of a soccer ball and is one of a number of fascinating species that live in the diverse tropical forests of Southeast Asia—a region ravaged by poaching from snares.

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6 days ago

#Regram@worldeconomicforum: Australian bushfires are creating a terrifying weather phenomenon.3 people have already died. #environment#fires#wildlife#sydney#australia

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6 days ago

#Regram#RG@aussieark: Officials have issued a warning of "catastrophic fire danger" as firefighters battle over 60 blazes raging across the Australian state of New South Wales, which has caused the tragic loss of lives and livelihoods. There have already been significant harmful impacts to wildlife, with entire ecosystems up in smoke and individual species affected, including around 350 Koalas presumed dead – all before the fires reach their peak.Our hearts go out to the victims of the current fires, which we know have been exacerbated by the decline of native biodiversity. Australia has the worst mammal extinction rate on Earth, and the country is amongst the worst 7 countries worldwide for biodiversity loss. Australian conservation efforts need a radical overhaul. Mitigating the intensity of these fires, mostly set by humans and their activities, can be achieved by restoring our native ecosystem engineers, such as bandicoots, bettongs and potoroos. These species help to maintain healthy forests by continually turning over and breaking down forest leaf litter, thereby drastically reducing fuel load. In their absence, fires are more intense, often reaching the treetops, which can affect populations of species already on the brink, like the Koala. Slow growing and ancient Australian East coast temperate forests are of global significance, as these forests have some of the highest carbon storage on the planet. Fires of this intensity threaten their very existence but managing wildlife to reduce fire intensity and protect forests is underappreciated for its importance in reducing the release of carbon into the atmosphere.Aussie Ark works with Australia’s most threatened and imperiled wildlife, several of which are extinct on the mainland. Native wildlife conservation sanctuaries provide refuge, as well as source populations for rewilding and restoring Australia’s native ecosystems.Our sincere well wishes go out to all those affected by these devastating fires. If you encounter any injured wildlife, please contact your local animal authorities for rescue and rehabilitation.

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1 weeks ago

Ghana’s #Atewa Forest Reserve provides drinking water to 5 million+ people & harbors 100+ wildlife species at risk of extinction. We must prioritize the protection of these irreplaceable places for a healthy planet. Read more @washingtonpost: wapo.st/2oDUBFi @arochaghana#SaveAtewaForestNowPhoto courtesy of A Rocha

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2 weeks ago

#Regram#RG@washingtonpost:Rising seas will be much worse and more expensive to deal with than previously thought, new research finds. Even under a scenario of very modest climate change, 150 million people worldwide will live below the high-tide level by 2050 and 190 million will by 2100. If climate change and sea level rise follow a worse path, as many as 340 million people living below the high-tide level could be in peril, to say nothing of how many could be affected by floods and extreme events. Such figures are three times — or more — higher than earlier estimates. Read more by clicking the link in the @washingtonpost’s bio.

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2 weeks ago

#Regram#RG@cnnclimate:October 2019 was the warmest October ever, according to data from the European Union’s Copernicus Climate Change Service, an organization that tracks global temperatures. This year has seen several hottest-month records, including July, which Copernicus said was the warmest month of all on record, replacing the record set in July 2016. Copernicus has been tracking temperatures the planet’s temperatures since 1979. (📸:Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

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2 weeks ago

#Regram#RG@apnews: How do you help endangered gorillas? With lots of human help. The Associated Press traveled deep into Rwanda’s rainforest where mountain gorillas are making a rare comeback. It wouldn’t have happened without an intervention known as “extreme conservation” that includes monitoring every single gorilla, occasionally intervening with veterinary care and funding forest protection by sending money into communities. Read the full story at apnews.com Video by Bram Janssen and Marshall Ritzel

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2 weeks ago

Actor and activist Jane Fonda tells CNN’s Don Lemon that civil disobedience is the “new normal” in order to enact change and address the climate crisis. Fonda has said she wants to get arrested every Friday to raise awareness about the devastating challenges that are facing the Earth, calling these protests “Fire Drill Fridays.” Repost from @cnnclimate

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