0 Stories
Image
Yesterday

Finally. ⁣⁣After decades of searching, astronomers have found what they’ve been looking for: a galaxy cluster where large numbers of stars are being born at its core. ⁣⁣Galaxy clusters are the largest structures in the cosmos that are held together by gravity, consisting of hundreds or thousands of galaxies. For decades, astronomers have looked for galaxy clusters containing rich nurseries of stars. Instead, they found powerful, giant black holes pumping out energy and keeping the gas too warm to form many stars. Until now. ⁣⁣Data from @NASAHubble and @nasachandraxray is revealing new details about how the most massive black holes in the universe affect their host galaxies. Click the link in the bio for more info ⬆️⁣⁣Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/G.Schellenberger et al.; Optical:SDSS⁣⁣#NASA#GalaxyCluster#BlackHoles

0
Image
2 days ago

No matter the similarities and differences, every galaxy is beautiful in its own way. 💜 💫⁣⁣In this image from @NASAHubble, we see a galaxy very similar to our own Milky Way. NGC 772 is a spiral galaxy. From a glowing center, bright specks of star formation weave into dark ripples of cosmic dust. ⁣⁣NGC 772 differs from our home galaxy in that it’s a “peculiar” spiral galaxy — meaning it is odd in size, shape or composition. However, this doesn't change how stunningly beautiful it is. ⁣⁣Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Seth et al.⁣⁣#Galaxy#NASA#BeautyIsEverywhere

0
Image
4 days ago

Our scientists launched rockets from the top of the world! 🌎🚀 In the tiny Arctic town of Ny-Ålesund, where polar bears outnumber people, winter means three months without sunlight. The unending darkness is ideal for those who seek a strange breed of northern lights, normally obscured by daylight. When these unusual auroras shine, Earth’s atmosphere leaks into space.Our scientists traveled to Ny-Ålesund to launch rockets through these auroras and witness oxygen particles right in the middle of their escape. Piercing these fleeting auroras, some 300 miles high, would require strategy, patience — and a fair bit of luck. This was our VISIONS-2 mission, and this is their story.VISIONS-2 was just the first of many. Over the coming months, rocket teams from all over the world will launch rockets into this region as part of the Grand Challenge Initiative—Cusp, an international collaboration to study the mysteries of the polar atmosphere.Read more: //go.nasa.gov/VISIONS2blog#nasa#space#rocketscience#rocketlaunch#science

0
Image
5 days ago

5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0... Lift-off! 🚀 ⛈️ 50 years ago, Apollo 12 launched into a dark and rainy morning sky. ⁣⁣With Apollo 12 at about 6,600 feet altitude, observers on the ground saw lightning striking the launch pad. The Saturn V rocket was unaffected and continued to operate normally. But in Mission Control, data on controllers’ displays turned garbled. Luckily, a quick-thinking flight controller, John Aaron, had a fix. The crew onboard the spacecraft reset an obscure system, and data returned to the screens in Mission Control. Once Apollo 12 mission commander Pete Conrad understood the cause of the excitement, he radioed to Houston, “I think we need to do a little more all-weather testing.” ⁣⁣Five days later on Nov. 19, 1969, the Apollo 12 lunar module Intrepid landed on the Moon in a region called the Ocean of Storms, approximately 950 miles west of where Apollo 11 landed and only 535 feet from our robotic Surveyor III mission.⁣⁣Images Credit: NASA⁣⁣#apollo#apollo12#launch#rocket#nasa#history#saturnv

0
Image
6 days ago

Tiny planet Mercury transits the Sun 👀⁣⁣⁣⁣On Nov. 11, Mercury crossed between Earth and the Sun - a rare event we won't be able to see again until 2032. Our Solar Dynamics Observatory, which views the Sun in a variety of wavelengths of light in the extreme ultraviolet, tracked Mercury's journey.⁣⁣⁣⁣Credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio ⁣⁣⁣⁣#sun#transit#mercury#mercurytransit#solarsystem#nasa

0
Image
2 weeks ago

There’s a storm brewing in the solar system! 🌩️⁣⁣Our @NASAJuno spacecraft captured this stunningly detailed look at a cyclonic storm in Jupiter's atmosphere during its 23rd close flyby of the planet. ⁣⁣Juno observed this vortex in a region of Jupiter called the “north north north north temperate belt,” one of the gas giant planet’s many persistent cloud bands. These bands are formed by the prevailing winds at different latitudes. The vortex seen here is roughly 1,200 miles (2,000 kilometers) wide.⁣⁣Citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill created this image using data from the spacecraft's JunoCam imager when the spacecraft was about 5,300 miles (8,500 kilometers) from Jupiter’s cloud tops above a latitude of about 49 degrees. ⁣Image credit: Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS⁣Image processing by Kevin M. Gill, © CC BY⁣⁣#NASA#Jupiter#SolarSystem#Swirls#Clouds

0
Image
2 weeks ago

✨“We are made of star-stuff. We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.”✨ Today we remember planetary scientist Carl Sagan on his birthday. ⁣⁣Within a galaxy hosting around 300 billion stars, here @NASAHubble has captured a mere handful or two. These stars fall within NGC 1333, located about 1,000 light-years away in the constellation of Perseus. The cool gas and dust concentrated in this region is generating new stars whose light is then reflecting off the surrounding material, lighting it up and making this object’s lingering presence known to us.⁣⁣#NASA#Hubble#Space#Stars#Astronomy#CarlSaganDay

0
Image
2 weeks ago

The "intricate, mesmerizing patterns of the International Space Station (@ISS) solar arrays." ☀️⁣⁣The second image here is a close-up taken by @Astro_Jessica on Nov. 7 during a photo survey of the arrays, which convert solar energy to electrical power. ⁣⁣In the space station's orbit 220 miles above Earth, the best source of energy is sunlight. When the station is in the Sun, about 60 percent of the electricity collected by its solar arrays is used to charge the station's batteries. The batteries then provide power to the station's systems during nighttime passes around Earth. ⁣⁣Images Credit: NASA⁣⁣#spacestation#solarpower#sun#solarcells#nasa#iss

0
Image
2 weeks ago

The glow of the Milky Way arcs across a sea of stars... and planets! 🌌⁣⁣This panorama of the southern sky was created with 208 images from a year of observations by our Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission. Swipe through the images to see TESS's discoveries: first, the host stars of 29 confirmed exoplanets (worlds beyond our solar system), and second, more than 1,000 candidate planets astronomers are now investigating. ⁣ ⁣To find exoplanets, the four TESS cameras capture a full sector of the sky every 30 minutes to search for transits. Transits occur when a planet passes in front of its host star from our perspective, briefly and regularly dimming its light. ⁣⁣Images Credit: NASA/MIT/TESS and Ethan Kruse (USRA)⁣⁣#milkyway#nightsky#panorama#exoplanets#stars

0
Image
2 weeks ago

Not all galaxies are lonely. Some have galaxy squads. ⁣⁣NGC 1706, captured in this image by @NASAHubble, belongs to something known as a galaxy group, which is just as the name suggests — a group of up to 50 galaxies which are gravitationally bound and relatively close to each other. ⁣⁣Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, has its own squad — known as the Local Group, which also contains the Andromeda galaxy, the Large and Small Magellanic clouds and the Triangulum galaxy. Click the link in the bio for more info ⬆️⁣⁣Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Bellini et al.⁣ #galaxy#squadgoals#hubble#cosmos#universe

0
Image
3 weeks ago

Waving goodbye to a spacecraft. 👋 Astronaut Christina Koch used the robotic arm on the International Space Station (@ISS) to release Japan's "Kounotori" HTV cargo ship on Nov. 1, after it spent 34 days attached to the station's Harmony module. ⁣⁣Launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan on Sept. 24, Kounotori, meaning “white stork” in Japanese, delivered about five tons of supplies and science experiments as well as new lithium-ion batteries to the station. ⁣⁣"Gone but not forgotten!," wrote Koch. "Watching the HTV cargo ship depart Space Station⁣today and remembering the complex dance of the robotic arm that marked the beginning of its stay." ⁣⁣Image Credit: NASA⁣⁣#spaceship#spacestation#sunrise#jaxa#goodbye

0
Image
3 weeks ago

Cue a jaw-drop😮⁣⁣Behold, our beautiful planet Earth in all its natural splendor, captured from 250 miles above by the International Space Station (@ISS) commander Luca Parmitano. ⁣⁣As you read this, six humans are orbiting planet Earth at 17,500 mph in a football-field sized microgravity laboratory. During their time on the space station, they conduct important science and research that not only benefits life here on Earth, but will eventually help us send humans deeper into the solar system than ever before.⁣⁣Credit: @EuropeanSpaceAgency / Luca Parmitano⁣

0